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Men and self-esteem

Male Tinder users report lower levels of self-esteem

Males users of popular dating app Tinder appear to have lower levels of self-esteem and more negative perception of body image than those who don’t use the app, a study has found.

The study was presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

In the study, 1,044 women and 273 men were asked to complete questionnaires that asked about their use of Tinder.  The questions were aimed at identifying their sense of body image, sociocultural factors, perceived objectification and psychological well-being.

Tinder is a dating app available on mobile devices with a reported 50 million active users. Individual profiles are rated by other users as acceptable by swiping right or unacceptable by swiping left. If two users deem each other acceptable, then they are “matched” and can begin communicating with one another.

Both male and female users reported less self-satisfaction with their bodies but only male Tinder users reported lower levels of self-esteem.

“We found that being actively involved with Tinder, regardless of the user’s gender, was associated with body dissatisfaction, body shame, body monitoring, internalization of societal expectations of beauty, comparing oneself physically to others, and reliance on media for information on appearance and attractiveness,” said Jessica Strübel, PhD, of the University of North Texas, who presented the research.

Users become depersonalized and disposable

The authors of the study contend that due to the nature of the app, users, after a while, tend to feel depersonalized and disposable in their social interactions, develop heightened awareness (and criticism) of their looks and bodies.

They believe that there is always something better around the corner, or rather with the next swipe of their screen, even while questioning their own worth.

“We found that being actively involved with Tinder, regardless of the user’s gender, was associated with body dissatisfaction, body shame, body monitoring, internalization of societal expectations of beauty, comparing oneself physically to others, and reliance on media for information on appearance and attractiveness,” said Strübel.

But the authors were also quick to point out that the app itself cannot be held responsible for low self-esteem and poor body image of its users. They argue that it could be just as likely that people with lower self-esteem are drawn more to these types of apps.

Also read:

Understanding ‘ambient intimacy’ on twitter

Can self-esteem be influenced by Facebook?

Understanding the selfie addiction

 

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